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Ohinemuri Regional History Journal 16, June 1972

IN THE SHADOW OF TOTARA PA - NGATI MARUTUAHU

By TE KAHUWHAKAANGI NICHOLLS

In the beginning, there was the sea, and in time this subsided, leaving behind a large land mass which eventually became rich, lush and fertile and as aeons of years passed away there arrived - the man. The sea was known as Tikapa (the Firth of Thames), the land mass, because it faced the north was called Hauraki and the man - Marutuahu.

Marutuahu left Kawhia in search of his father Hotunui whom he found living with the Uri-o-pou tribe at Whakatiwai. Not long after his arrival he took to wife the two grand-daughters of Ruahiore, - (1) Hineurunga and (2) Paremoehau. From the union with the elder sister, there were born the well known sons, Tamatepo, Tamatera and Whanaunga. To the younger sister two children were born, Te Ngako and Taurukapakapa.

The brothers Tamatera and Whanaunga each had a tribe named after him, the former in and around the Ohinemuri district and the latter at Ahimia, 30 miles north of Thames. Te Ngako however wished to perpetuate the name and memory of his father forever, and therefore called his people Ngati Marutuahu. (Repeatedly this term has been loosely used, embracing the tribes from Te Aroha to Moehau, but this is false. The correct term is, the people of Marutuahu and this right was his through conquest).

Te Ngako had two sons, the elder, Naunau and the younger the very famous Kahu Rautao - who in turn had an equally famous son Rautao. Today you will find the descendants of Naunau still living on ancestral lands - in the shadow of Te Totara Pa, and those of his brother Kahu Rautao just 3 miles to the south of this very famous and sacred spot.

WHAKAPAPA

Marutuahu -- Paremoehau

Tengako

Naunau

Tarawaikato

Nehia

Peru

Ramarihi

Kipa

Hoani

Te Awhimake = Humphrey Nicholls

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Hoani Kipa Nicholls           Iehu Nicholls = Te Kahuwhakaangi